rhetoric in the late age of the internet

Some 25 years ago, Jay Bolter described the “late age of print” not as an era when print media were disappearing but rather as time when the question of an impending end began to characterize how we understood the technology. In imagining a late ago of the internet, some semantic clarification is necessary. I do…

consensual and competing media hallucinations

In Neuromancer William Gibson famously described cyberspace as A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts… A graphic representation of data abstracted from banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations…

friendship, encryption, and servers

Let’s side aside the partisan politics for a moment and consider these matters more broadly. I believe it was Ben Franklin who said, “Three men can keep a secret if two of them are dead.” It suggests a couple things. Perhaps a lack of self control come to mind, but I think of the sociality…

sharing and caring in the social web

In the nightmarish scene below, a purple dinosaur commands that you “share your stuff:” If you are of a certain generation, younger than I (or parents of that generation), then the refrain that “sharing is caring” might be echoing through your skull. In the world of Fb, of course, sharing takes on a whole new…

students can’t write and other slow news days

Making the Facebook rounds of late is this article that makes the titular observation that “Poor Writing Skills Are Costing Businesses’ Billions.” Huh. Maybe so. The article, posted a week ago, cites three reports on this situation… from 2004, 2006, and 2011. Maybe the situation hasn’t improved. Probably not. I doubt anything systematic has been done…

language, programming, and procedure

Following on my last post, by coincidence I picked up a copy of Max Berry’s Lexicon, which is in the sci-fi supernatural genre, light reading but well-reviewed. It’s basic premise is that language triggers neurochemical responses in the brain and that there are underlying operating languages that can compel and program humans. The result is something…

integration and dissolution in general education

We’ve been discussing the relative merits of integration as a curricular value. The basic premise of integration is fairly straightforward. It asserts that students get more out of their education when they can connect their courses together. We know that students commonly complain that the traditional general education curriculum is meaningless to them. It doesn’t…

going to graduate school in English

Probably the last in this series of posts surrounding the MLA silly season. While senior grad students, recent phds, and others prepare for their job interviews, another crop of potential graduate students are entering the pipeline. A recent post from The Little Professor  responding to some Facebook comments from Michael Berube, suggests that graduate programs should cover…

movement to wordpress

After ten years, I’ve moved from typepad to wordpress. I won’t bore you with the story, but I’m still working on migrating my disqus-based comments. Hopefully that will all be worked out this weekend. celluphone fast cash

more on critical thinking

First, my apologies to those who have commented here recently. Apparently when I hit the upgrade button on the latest version of Disqus, it altered some settings and I stopped receiving email alerts when comments were submitted. It's all fixed now, but as a result I dropped the ball on the possibility of a good…