reading Alex Galloway’s “Cybernetic Hypothesis”

This is an article that came out last year in Differences (25.1), but my library doesn’t have access to the most recent issues, so I’m catching up. I’m writing here about it in part because it connects with my recent post on reading practices, as well as more generally with interest in digital matters. In the past…

literary studies, modesty, and a second empiricism

Perhaps you were like me and didn’t catch this Chronicle piece last month when it was published in the run-up to MLA where Jeffrey Williams touts the “New Modesty in Literary Criticism.” What is this new modesty? Williams suggests that Literary critics have become more subdued, adopting methods with less grand speculation, more empirical study, and more…

Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities: a new essay collection

Fresh off the presses, Rhetoric and the Digital Humanities, edited by Jim Ridolfo and William Hart-Davidson, from University of Chicago Press (AMZN). Here’s the abstract to my contribution, “Digital Humanities Now and the Possibilities of a Speculative Digital Rhetoric.” This chapter examines connections between big data digital humanities projects (the Digital Humanities Now project in particular),…

pedagogy, computers and writing, and the digital humanities #cwdhped

Over the past couple days there’s been a Twitter conversation (#cwdhped) and an evolving open Google doc that explores the idea of some summit or FTF discussion among scholars in the digital humanities and those in computers and writing on shared interests in pedagogy. For those that don’t know, “computers and writing” is a subfield of…

when the future isn’t like the past

A group of scholars respond to MLA’s proposal regarding doctoral education in Inside Higher Ed, another group propose to replace MLA’s executive director with a triumvirate who will focus on the problems of adjunctification, on Huffington Post, a university president write in defense of a liberal arts education: these are all different slices of a larger issue. On…

MLA, doctoral education, and the benefits of hindsight

The MLA has released a task force report on “Doctoral Study in Modern Language and Literature.” Primarily it recommends engaging with technology how many payday loans in a year washington state reducing time to degree rethinking the dissertation (see the bullet point above) emphasizing teaching validating “diverse career outcomes” (my personal favorite) Not coincidentally, my…

digital humanities and the “s” word

Dear blog, if it weren’t for the slow demise of the humanities and the soap opera that surrounds it, what would there be to discuss? The “s” word, of course, is “save.” And the whole will DH save the humanities in time, tune in next week business should be getting old by now. But it’s…

software evolution and software epistemology

We’ve been reading Manovich’s Software Takes Command  in my media theory course. The driving question of the book is “what happens to media after software?” If that question strikes you as McLuhanesque, then I would say you are on the right track. The book has a historical element. It begins in the 60s and 70s, looking…

not your dissertation advisor’s turf war

Marc Bousquet has a piece in the Chronicle that is trending academically-speaking on “The Moral Panic in Literary Studies.” It would be easy to read this piece as a rehearsal of what has now become a familiar song, at least in English, about disciplinary turf wars among literary studies, rhetoric, and the other fields within…

where (or if) DH fits

Ted Underwood has a great post exploring the challenges of “fitting” DH into literature departments. He observes Humanities curricula may evolve, but I don’t think the majority of English or History departments are going to embrace rapid structural change — for instance, change of the kind that would be required to support graduate programs in…