humanities (in)decision-making

In The New Yorker, Joshua Rothman continues the discussion about the relative wisdom of entering graduate school in the humanities. In my mind, it comes down to this: getting a phd in the humanities (9.3 years on average) takes so damn long that it is almost impossible to measure the cost and benefit of it….

metanoia: progress and regret #hastac2013

  Metanoia: Speculating on Progress and Regret   Kairos is the watchword, the patron demi-god, of higher education and information technology today. Kairos, the Greek god of opportunity, both feeds and haunts the academy as our disciplines and institutions alternately leap to grasp at a new technology or hold back. Kairos has always been depicted…

composing snow globes (and dissertations)

From the Chronicle, William Germano writes on the staid nature of monographs, particularly first books. The academic book—especially that first academic book—is often conceived of as a snow globe. It’s carefully constructed to be a perfect little world, its main purpose to be admired. There’s a glass wall that separates the contents from the reader….

do android graders dream of electric comma splices?

On e-Literate, Elijah Mayfield has a good post addressing some of the myths (his term) going on around the subject of machine grading, particularly in response to the NY Times article that provocatively suggested that "Essay Grading Software Offers Professors a Break." I've been re-reading Manuel DeLanda's Philosophy and Simulation for my speculative realism class,…

fields, streams, and other media ecologies

Collin Brooke has a recent post revisiting an old CCCC presentation (I was there and posted about it back then. Collin updates his thinking in response to Anil Dash's talk on "The Web We Lost" and here. Jeff Rice also writes about Dash. All three offer views on what we've lost or gained as culture or…

community, experiment, and the future of composition

The SUNY Council of Writing's annual conference was held yesterday in Buffalo. There were a number of interesting panels. Richard Miller and Kelly Kinney gave excellent plenary talks. Here I want to think about some of these conversations in relation to what we are doing at UB and my own vision for composition's future.  Kelly…

Latour and correlationism

Earlier this month, Levi had a post discussing his reservations regarding the term correlationism. His concern, as I understand it, is that we have reached a point where, at least in some circles, the declaration that somthing is "correlationist" has become a move to dismiss it out of hand. Levi, on the other hand, wants…

Vitanza’s big rhetoric and “some more”

Iternation has an interview with Victor Vitanza where he discusses the idea of "big rhetoric" (see below). Big rhetoric is a concept that has been around for a few decades. It remarks on the move by which all forms of symbolic communication come to be seen as rhetorical. It is arguably part of the larger…

machines are readers too

As Steve Krause has noted and has been discussed a fair amount recently on the WPA-list, there is reason to be concerned with the growing role of grading writing by machines. There is a new site and petition (humanreaders.org), and I have added my name to that petition. So it should be clear that fundamentally…

object-oriented marketing… sort of

Atlantic Monthly has an article this month, "Anthropology Inc," that examines the ethnographic work of corporate anthropologists (a contentious term in itself, at least for academic anthropologists). The article focuses on a single company and one of its co-founders Christian Madsbjerg.  Madsbjerg had a list of clients desperate for Heideggerian readings of their businesses. The service…